DELF B1 Listening Exam: An Overview and Sample Paper

CCube Academy
6 min readFeb 2, 2023

Learning a language can be incredibly difficult, especially if you are inexperienced with it. But with the DELF B1 French listening exam, you can gain fluency in addition to an internationally-recognized certification! In this article, we will provide an overview of what is required from the exam and a sample paper so that you can begin preparing for it.

Introduction to DELF B1 Listening Exam

The DELF B1 Listening exam is designed to test your ability to understand spoken French in a range of different contexts. The exam consists of four sections, each of which includes a range of questions testing different skills. In the first section, you will be asked to identify specific information in short recordings. In the second section, you will need to inference meaning from longer conversations or talks. The third section tests your ability to follow directions, and the fourth assesses your ability to understand an academic lecture.

To complete the DELF B1 Listening exam, you will need to demonstrate an understanding of spoken French at an intermediate level. This means that you should be able to:

- Understand most basic daily conversations

- Follow simple directions

- Understand a short talk on a familiar topic

- Understand the main points of an academic lecture

Overview of the Listening Section of the DELF B1 Exam

The DELF B1 listening section of the exam is composed of four parts, each with a different task. In the first three parts, you will be asked to demonstrate your ability to understand spoken French in real-world situations. The fourth part tests your ability to follow oral directions.

Part 1: You will listen to four short conversations and answer six questions about them. The conversations will take place in everyday situations, such as two friends meeting for coffee or two co-workers discussing a project.

Part 2: You will listen to a short conversation or monologue and answer four questions about it. The conversation or monologue will deal with an every day topic, such as making plans for the weekend or giving directions to a tourist.

Part 3: You will listen to a longer conversation or monologue and answer four questions about it. The conversation or monologue will be more abstract than those in Parts 1 and 2, and may discuss topics such as the pros and cons of emigrating to another country.

Part 4: You will listen to oral directions and complete a task based on them. The task may involve drawing a picture or placing symbols on a map.

What is Tested in the Listening Exam and How to Prepare for it?

The Listening exam tests your ability to understand spoken French in a variety of real-life situations. The exam is divided into four parts, each of which assesses a different language skill.

Part 1 tests your ability to understand short, everyday conversations such as those you might have with a friend, colleague or family member. These conversations usually involve two or three people and are recorded at a natural speed.

Part 2 asks you to listen to someone giving a talk or presentation on a particular topic. The talks are usually about current affairs, culture or educational topics and are recorded at a slightly slower pace than normal conversation.

Part 3 requires you to listen to extracts from radio broadcasts, interviews and conversations. These are generally recorded at a natural speed and include longer turns of speech than in Parts 1 and 2.

Finally, Part 4 asks you to listen to an academic-style lecture and take notes accordingly. The lectures are typically delivered by university professors and are recorded at a normal pace.

To prepare for the Listening exam, it is essential that you familiarise yourself with the types of tasks and questions that will be asked. It is also important to practise listening to French as often as possible, so that you can get used to hearing the language spoken at different speeds. Try listening to French news broadcasts, podcasts or TV programmes, or even chatting with native French speakers online. With enough practice, you’ll be able to understand everything that’s being said in the

What to Expect from a Sample Paper?

When you sit down to take the DELF B Listening exam, you will be given a paper with instructions and four audio tracks. The audio tracks will be played once and you will have to answer questions based on what you hear.

The DELF B Listening exam is designed to test your ability to understand spoken French in a variety of real-life situations. The questions on the exam are based on four different audio tracks, each of which features a different speaker and conversation.

To prepare for the listening portion of the DELF B exam, it is important to listen to as many different types of French speakers as possible. This will help you get used to the various accents and speeds at which people speak. It is also helpful to practice taking notes while listening to an audio track. This will help you focus on key points and make it easier to answer the questions afterwards.

Once you have familiarized yourself with the format of the DELF B Listening exam, it is a good idea to take a look at a sample paper. This can give you an idea of what types of questions are typically asked on the exam.

Understanding and Answering the Questions

Assuming you want a content section for a blog article discussing the DELF B listening exam:

The DELF B2 listening exam is designed to test your ability to understand spoken French in a variety of settings, including conversations, lectures, and radio broadcasts. The exam lasts approximately 30 minutes and is divided into four parts.

In the first part of the exam, you will hear a conversation between two people and will be asked to answer three questions about what was said. This part of the exam lasts approximately 5 minutes.

In the second part of the exam, you will hear a monologue on an academic topic and will be asked to answer three questions about what was said. This part of the exam lasts approximately 10 minutes.

In the third part of the exam, you will hear two or three short conversations and will be asked to answer six questions about what was said. This part of the exam lasts approximately 10 minutes.

In the fourth and final part of the exam, you will hear a long conversation and will be asked to answer six questions about what was said. This part of the exam lasts approximately 5 minutes.

To prepare for this examination, it is important that you familiarize yourself with all four types of listening tasks that may be included on the test. In addition, you should practice taking notes while listening to French conversations and lectures to improve your comprehension skills.

Tips and Advice for Studying for the Exam

It is essential to prepare for the DELF B listening exam in order to ensure success. Below are some tips and advice on how to best study for the exam:

Listen to audio recordings of native French speakers as often as possible. This will help you get used to the speed and pronunciation of the language.

Read transcripts of audio recordings or written texts along with the audio. This will help you improve your comprehension skills.

Practice taking DELF B practice exams under timed conditions. This will help you get used to the format of the exam and identify any areas that need improvement.

Conclusion

Passing the DELF B1 Listening exam can open up many opportunities, whether you are looking to study or work abroad. With a comprehensive look at what’s involved in this exam and an example paper as practice material, we hope that our article has helped you prepare for your next goal. Take some time to brush up on interpreting information, understanding instructions and commenting on situations before attempting the real thing and don’t forget to manage your stress levels, too! Good luck with your exam.

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